Must see: Museum Bank Indonesia

As promised more photos from my Kota Tua trip. Now, the visit to Museum Bank Indonesia was not really part of my plans. But I went there anyway because I was finding it difficult finding a cab (an occurrence I am very much getting used to by now) and the museum was right in front of me. Best decision ever. Not only was it mercifully air-conditioned, it was also a visual treat that came at no price.

Jl. Pintu Besar Utara No. 3
West Jakarta – Indonesia
Ph. 62-21- 2600158
Fax.62-21-2601730
Email:museum@bi.go.id

Tuesday – Friday: 07.30 AM – 03.30 PM
Saturday – Sunday: 08.00 AM – 04.00 PM

Monday & Holiday Close

Free of Charge

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Quick trip to Kota Tua

Quick because I started out late and the sun was so intense I had to cut my excursion after only two hours.

Kota Tua translates to Old Town and is also known as Old Batavia in recognition of its Dutch origin. As per Wikipedia, “as an important settlement, urban center, and the center of commerce in Asia since 16th century, Oud Batavia is home of several important historical sites and buildings.”

However, I must say though that I am a bit saddened by the current state of those so-called historical sites. Granted that I have only visited Jakarta History Museum and Wayang Museum but it is those two that made me wish that they could have been better taken care of. Still, I had fun checking out the puppets at the Wayang Museum and I was able to watch a puppet musical for the first time! I couldn’t understand a thing but I thoroughly enjoyed listening to traditional Indonesian music performed live.

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Fatahillah Square is also a very lively place where people mingle or take bicycle rides, photographers roam and living statues amuse everyone.

Here it is as seen from the second floor of Jakarta History Museum:

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Living statues beckoning for photo ops:

Lunch was at the iconic Cafe Batavia and it’s like stepping into another place once I entered its doors. The place was designed to look like a classy colonial pub and it reeked of elegance with its polished interiors and fascinating photo-filled walls. It is also here where I tasted the best nasi goreng I’ve had so far. It is really good!

There was a sign upfront that says one has to ask management first in order to take pictures. I just whipped up my phone for a quick snapshot of the impressive photo collection by the staircase.

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More pictures from Kota Tua on my next posts!

 

The Big Durian at Night

While crossing the parking lot, I decided to take a quick snapshot of the skyline. It was literally point and shoot with my iPhone because a car was coming my way. When I checked the photo later, I was surprised that the street lights produced a flower-like glow.

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Hello Jakarta!

So I know this post is long overdue. I arrived days ago but there were tons of stuff to take care of first. Without further ado then…

April 10, 2013: I arrived in Jakarta, Indonesia sealing my fate now as one of the thousand Filipinos working abroad. I am now an OFW! Well technically not yet since my working permit is still being processed by the good folks at the Consulate. But I’m getting there.

billboard that immediately greets everyone upon going out of the airport.

My first impression with Jakarta is that it is very similar to Metro Manila in terms of appearance. At least, based on what I’ve seen from the airport to the hotel. I had a good chuckle though when I noticed that after the welcome billboard from above, the next advertising materials I saw are for the following:

  • Lotte (it was a huge billboard and yes it was for the Japanese-Korean corporation)
  • a bottled iced tea called Mirai Ocha with the tagline Ganbatte!
  • a Sakura corporation
  • Bank of Tokyo

For a second there, I thought I was in that other place which name starts with Ja- too!

Anyway, I figured out what would be my first big adventure here when I was to go home after surrendering my passport to the office the next day: TRANSPORTATION.

Unlike the Philippines and Singapore, there are no trains here. The main mode of public transportation are taxis, buses and ojeks (motorcyles). I’ve been advised that taxis are the best way to go, especially for foreigners who don’t speak Bahasa Indonesian and are not yet familiar with the place. I can say the taxi rates are more or less reasonable. What’s daunting though is the traffic. And my trip alone from airport to the hotel has proven to me that indeed, traffic in Jakarta is legendary. Traffic + taxi? Not a good combination 🙂 Not to mention Jakarta is huge! Sprawling even. And I haven’t even gotten out of the South section yet where I am based. But I’ll figure this one out in due time. I look forward to exploring every nook and cranny that this city has to offer.

It’s basically office-home for me the past few days as I wouldn’t dare venturing out without my passport with me. But yesterday, I went to Mall of Indonesia, which looked nearby on the map but apparently quite far from where I am in reality. Me and my map reading skills. Argh. However, seeing the area’s architecture brightened up my day. Yup, I can see the Dutch influence alright.

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High on my priority list of places to see is Kota Tua or Old Town. Buildings from the Dutch colonial period are still intact there. Plus there are a lot of museums. Should be fun.

Until the next adventure!

Turning Javanese

Just got my visa today so it’s definitely all systems go. Moving to Jakarta in a few days!

And yes I know my title is politically incorrect since it’s not Java, Indonesia I’m moving to but I just can’t help using the pun. In an alternate universe, that would literally be “Turning Japanese”.

Anyway, I’ve actually never been to Jakarta or anywhere in Indonesia for that matter. But now I’m to stay there for at least a year. Exciting times ahead!

All I know about Jakarta at this point are the following: it is one of the largest economies in Asia, traffic there is as bad (or maybe even worse?) than that of Manila, the country has strong historical ties to the Netherlands (hey Desi!), jrock is huge there (hello #LarukuJKT!) and their cuisine is absolutely fantastic! And have I already mentioned that jrock there is HUGE? Perhaps next time, my voice would be among the thousands who was jamming along to this song: